Anime/Manga subculture terminology

Posted by: kiku

Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/09/12 12:54 PM

We use so much terminology that many casual fans might be unaware of, I thought it might behoove us to provide some useful information. This wikipedia link contains quite a bit of terminology. If anyone else would like to add, edit, clarify, etc... by all means; feel free.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_anime_and_manga
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/09/12 01:00 PM

TRSIctionary entry for "jigglenauts":

Jigglenauts: adj. Having copious amounts, in direct relation to ecchi fan service. i.e. "Gravion Zwei has jigglenauts of fan service."

TRSIctionary entry for "Jigglewatts":

Jigglewatts: adj. (alt. form of jigglenauts) Having copious amounts, in direct relation to ecchi fan service. i.e. "Plastic Little has jigglewatts of fan service."

TRSIctionary edit for "Jigglewatts":

I imagine Jigglewatts to be a general measure of jigglage. Very much akin to how earthquakes are measured on the richter scale, The overall jigglage of an episode, movie, or series can rate anywhere between 1 and 10 jigglewatts on the jiggascale.
With a ranking of 8-10 Jigglewatts, an anime can really be considered a heavy contender amungst the best jigglenauts available today. ..Or at least best delivering of the jiggles/fan service.

TRSIctionary further reading for the root word "Jiggle":

Satoshi Urushihara's anime Plastic Little is disputably the first anime to utilize the "Jiggle Counter".
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/09/12 04:13 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
TRSIctionary entry for "jigglenauts":

Jigglenauts: adj. Having copious amounts, in direct relation to ecchi fan service. i.e. "Gravion Zwei has jigglenauts of fan service."

TRSIctionary entry for "Jigglewatts":

Jigglewatts: adj. (alt. form of jigglenauts) Having copious amounts, in direct relation to ecchi fan service. i.e. "Plastic Little has jigglewatts of fan service."

TRSIctionary edit for "Jigglewatts":

I imagine Jigglewatts to be a general measure of jigglage. Very much akin to how earthquakes are measured on the richter scale, The overall jigglage of an episode, movie, or series can rate anywhere between 1 and 10 jigglewatts on the jiggascale.
With a ranking of 8-10 Jigglewatts, an anime can really be considered a heavy contender amungst the best jigglenauts available today. ..Or at least best delivering of the jiggles/fan service.

TRSIctionary further reading for the root word "Jiggle":

Satoshi Urushihara's anime Plastic Little is disputably the first anime to utilize the "Jiggle Counter".

kiku, you're the Point Man on this kind of stuff... So here's one... Do the same thing only for Panty Shots.
References, just to name a few: Agent Aika & R-16, Sekirei, Najica Blitz tactics
Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/09/12 07:17 PM

I know this anime is new on the US side, but since seeing it. It is now the anime I think of when I think of panty shots Rosario + Vampire. I think it is because the preview shot is nothing but a panty shot.
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/09/12 08:04 PM

Originally Posted By: Cheap One
I know this anime is new on the US side, but since seeing it. It is now the anime I think of when I think of panty shots Rosario + Vampire. I think it is because the preview shot is nothing but a panty shot.

You don't know Panty Shots till you watch Agent Aika
(Itís given me a new found appreciation for Clean White Panties )

Posted by: joelgundam01

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/09/12 08:45 PM

Originally Posted By: BWBODDY
Originally Posted By: Cheap One
I know this anime is new on the US side, but since seeing it. It is now the anime I think of when I think of panty shots Rosario + Vampire. I think it is because the preview shot is nothing but a panty shot.

You don't know Panty Shots till you watch Agent Aika
(Itís given me a new found appreciation for Clean White Panties )

Or Najica Blitz Tactics.
Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/09/12 09:04 PM

Originally Posted By: BWBODDY
Originally Posted By: Cheap One
I know this anime is new on the US side, but since seeing it. It is now the anime I think of when I think of panty shots Rosario + Vampire. I think it is because the preview shot is nothing but a panty shot.

You don't know Panty Shots till you watch Agent Aika
(Itís given me a new found appreciation for Clean White Panties )



I've seen that one, it does have a lot of panty shots. And I do feel that hurts R+V in that reguard as the preview image is the only thing that comes to mind when thinking of that show and panty shots.

Though for me personally when I think of panty shots I will always think of Dead Or Alive as that is where I learned about panty shots back in 2000 on the Dreamcast.
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/09/12 09:13 PM

Originally Posted By: joelgundam01
Originally Posted By: BWBODDY
Originally Posted By: Cheap One
I know this anime is new on the US side, but since seeing it. It is now the anime I think of when I think of panty shots Rosario + Vampire. I think it is because the preview shot is nothing but a panty shot.

You don't know Panty Shots till you watch Agent Aika
(Itís given me a new found appreciation for Clean White Panties )

Or Najica Blitz Tactics.

Sorry, my bad frown... Yes and Najica Blitz Tactics grin

With all this talk of Panties I'm going to have to line up a little "
PAW" ( Pantsu Anime Weekend )
before I start on Clannad after story and the Clannad Movie
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/10/12 11:12 AM

TRSIctionary entry for "Gainax Bounce":

Gainax Bounce: n. Having an excessive level of jigglewattage, commonly associated the works of the anime studio Gainax. i.e. "I just finished Gunbuster 2 and the Gainax Bounce was off the charts."

Further reading for "Gainax Bounce":

The Gainax Bounce disputably originated in the anime Diebuster aka: Gunbuster 2.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/12/12 09:34 PM

I discovered the difference between an otaku and a weeaboo today.

An otaku is obsessed with japanese entertainment. i.e. anime, hentai, figures, manga, etc...

A weeaboo is obsessed with japanese culture. i.e. language, pocky, bento, fashion, etc...
Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/12/12 09:58 PM

I was under the impression that a weeaboo is someone non-asain who is into asian culture and is used mainly by people as an insult.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/12/12 10:08 PM

That would fit the bill. Otaku is used as a negative connotation more often than not as well.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/13/12 02:11 PM

Although more a forum abbreviation than anime term, it's often used here:

Forum abbreviation for "FTW"
FTW = For The Win


Further reading for forum abbreviations:
IIRC = If I Recall Correctly or If I Remember Correctly
IMO = In My Opinion
BTW = By The Way
LOL = Laughing Out Loud
ROFL = Rolling On The Floor Laughing
FYI = For Your Information
FWIW = For What It's Worth
TRSI = The Right Stuf International

Also of note:
Items contained between two asterisks at the end of a sentence represent a physical act on the part of the writer (poster).
For example: OMG your post is sooo funny! *falls out of chair*
Translated: I laughed so hard at what you wrote that I fell out of my chair.
Posted by: joelgundam01

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/13/12 02:18 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
Further reading for forum abbreviations:
IIRC = If I recall Correctly

Or "If I Remember Correctly".

Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/13/12 02:29 PM

Can't forgot FYI = For Your Information.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/13/12 02:35 PM

Excellent Cheap One and joelgundam01! Now we got this informative little topic on a roll. I'll edit my previous post to include your revisions/additions.
Posted by: joelgundam01

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/13/12 02:54 PM

Another one:

FWIW = For What It's Worth
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/13/12 03:28 PM

This is greatÖ Now if I can only remember to use them in my posts so I wonít forget them.

Oh and this one may be silly, but some have asked what it meantÖ

TRSI = The Right Stuf International
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/13/12 04:49 PM

Originally Posted By: joelgundam01
Another one:

FWIW = For What It's Worth
Got it. I added it to the original post.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/13/12 04:50 PM

Originally Posted By: BWBODDY
This is greatÖ Now if I can only remember to use then in my posts so I wonít forget them.

Oh and this one may be silly, but some have asked what it meantÖ

TRSI = The Right Stuf International
Well played, well played.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/13/12 06:23 PM

"EVAR!"

The term EVAR is loosely related to the word ever. It is often capitalized and followed by an exclamation point. Evar is used in place of ever for dramatic effect and to further illustrate the point. i.e. TRSI is the greatest online store EVAR!
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/13/12 06:35 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
"EVAR!"

The term EVAR is loosely related to the word ever. It is often capitalized and followed by an exclamation point. Evar is used in place of ever for dramatic effect and to further illustrate the point. i.e. TRSI is the greatest online store EVAR!

Okay, I just added that to my listÖ smile
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/12 01:42 AM

"Troll"

Someone who posts in a forum with the intent of eliciting a negative response from other posters, or to cause general confusion and otherwise derail a topic.

note: Someone making an off-topic post is not necessarily a troll, they are simply straying from the topic. Someone making repeated off-topic posts with the intent of derailing a topic, is a troll.
Posted by: Richard Harms

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/12 12:56 PM

Originally Posted By: BWBODDY
TRSI = The Right Stuf International
We try to stay away from calling ourselves TRSI or using the name with "International" on the end. We'll use "Right Stuf, Inc." as the formal corporate name, "Right Stuf" as the casual one, and "RightStuf.com" to refer to the retail side of the company. We'll always see TRSI all over the place, though. smile
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/12 01:35 PM

Originally Posted By: BWBODDY
TRSI = The Right Stuf International
We try to stay away from calling ourselves TRSI or using the name with "International" on the end. We'll use "Right Stuf, Inc." as the formal corporate name, "Right Stuf" as the casual one, and "RightStuf.com" to refer to the retail side of the company. We'll always see TRSI all over the place, though. smile [/quote]
Originally Posted By: Richard Harms
We'll always see TRSI all over the place, though. smile

Iíll continue to use TRSI, I just think it looks Cool when typed out and splashed in Red.
But thanks for the clarification Mr. Harms. I do think
TRSI just looks better,
wellÖ except for
RIGHTSTUF!, but you canít do the
Logo justice with the available fonts here on the Site.

But I shell Cease & Desist IF commanded to do so.
grin
Posted by: joelgundam01

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/12 01:36 PM

Originally Posted By: Richard Harms
Originally Posted By: BWBODDY
TRSI = The Right Stuf International
We try to stay away from calling ourselves TRSI or using the name with "International" on the end. We'll use "Right Stuf, Inc." as the formal corporate name, "Right Stuf" as the casual one, and "RightStuf.com" to refer to the retail side of the company. We'll always see TRSI all over the place, though. smile

I personally use TRSI, because my spell checker doesn't have a fit when I type it. wink

I guess TRSI can stand for "The Right Stuf, Inc." then. I don't see why you have to drop the word "the" from your name as well.
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/12 01:51 PM

Originally Posted By: joelgundam01
Originally Posted By: Richard Harms
Originally Posted By: BWBODDY
TRSI = The Right Stuf International
We try to stay away from calling ourselves TRSI or using the name with "International" on the end. We'll use "Right Stuf, Inc." as the formal corporate name, "Right Stuf" as the casual one, and "RightStuf.com" to refer to the retail side of the company. We'll always see TRSI all over the place, though. smile

I personally use TRSI, because my spell checker doesn't have a fit when I type it. wink

I guess TRSI can stand for "The Right Stuf, Inc." then. I don't see why you have to drop the word "the" from your name as well.

grin TRSI RULES !
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/12 08:57 PM

I'm at a loss. Am I supposed to stop saying TRSI when referring to RightStuf? I can by all means do that, if it's necessary.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/12 09:06 PM

"Cheesecake:"

Synonymous with fan service, with particular regard to ecchi.

ex.:"Godannar's cockpit cams are notorious for cheesecake shots."
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/12 09:08 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
I'm at a loss. Am I supposed to stop saying TRSI when referring to RightStuf? I can by all means do that, if it's necessary.

NAH! TRSI it is !!
Posted by: Richard Harms

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/16/12 12:45 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
I'm at a loss. Am I supposed to stop saying TRSI when referring to RightStuf? I can by all means do that, if it's necessary.
Nah ... was just a bit of almost-trivial I was mentioning in how we refer to ourselves. We still love the TRSI folks. smile
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/16/12 12:52 PM

My curiosity's peaked. Am I to assume that TRSI is a parent company of RightStuf?
Posted by: joelgundam01

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/16/12 12:55 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
My curiosity's peaked. Am I to assume that TRSI is a parent company of RightStuf?

When Rich said "TRSI folks", he was referring to those that still call it TRSI (ie us).
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/16/12 12:57 PM

So there is no longer a company entitled TRSI?
Posted by: joelgundam01

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/16/12 01:03 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
So there is no longer a company entitled TRSI?

They just changed their name a little.

When I first started shopping at Right Stuf (**points to sig**), it was called "The Right Stuf International" (TRSI for sort).

Over the years, Right Stuf changed their business model little by little and haven't been really living up to the "International" part, so they decided to drop it.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/16/12 01:21 PM

If the company that I know and love would rather be called RightStuf, then RightStuf it is. If I can remember anyhow. BTW I stumbled upon this little article at RightStuf: http://www.rightstuf.com/rssite/main/aboutRightStuf/ It's pretty interesting.
Posted by: joelgundam01

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/16/12 01:26 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
If the company that I know and love would rather be called RightStuf, then RightStuf it is. If I can remember anyhow.

I'll continue to call them TRSI. I'll just translate it as "The Right Stuf, Inc." instead of "The Right Stuf International" from now on. wink
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/16/12 02:33 PM

The Right Stuf Inc. (Incorporated) it is than grin
Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/16/12 02:34 PM

Before I saw it posted here, I thought TRSI did stand for The Right Stuf, Inc.
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/16/12 03:10 PM

I can't recall where, but my first encounter with TRSI the I was for International
It May have been from a Web Search or something, like I said I canít recall ???

Itís like here in Louisville, Kentucky, the Airport is now ( for a while now ) called Louisville International Airport.
Because we have the UPS Hub here ( I think the Main one ) and it does have International Flights.

But to me and a whole lot of other people it will always be Standiford Field, we think the International thing is a joke.
Posted by: Vata Raven

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/20/12 04:32 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
I discovered the difference between an otaku and a weeaboo today.

An otaku is obsessed with japanese entertainment. i.e. anime, hentai, figures, manga, etc...

A weeaboo is obsessed with japanese culture. i.e. language, pocky, bento, fashion, etc...

Isn't a weeaboo or whatever, are they the fans that are like "Screw English dubbed anime, they all suck, the original Japanese with subs are better and will always be." Well, you get the point or am I wrong?
Posted by: Hobby Ninja

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/20/12 05:17 PM

Originally Posted By: Vata Raven
Originally Posted By: kiku
I discovered the difference between an otaku and a weeaboo today.

An otaku is obsessed with japanese entertainment. i.e. anime, hentai, figures, manga, etc...

A weeaboo is obsessed with japanese culture. i.e. language, pocky, bento, fashion, etc...

Isn't a weeaboo or whatever, are they the fans that are like "Screw English dubbed anime, they all suck, the original Japanese with subs are better and will always be." Well, you get the point or am I wrong?

Wrong! At least in my case. I prefer English dub anime. I am an otaku and gladly admit it, at least in this country. Calling yourself an otaku in Japan will get you funny looks. Perhaps you are confusing people like me with the anal types who are all talk on certain forums who more than likely have never been to Japan.
I was unaware that there was a name for fans of Japanese culture. I am not surprised. There is a name for people who are fans of English culture. I confess that weeaboo is a silly sounding word. Haha.
Posted by: Vata Raven

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/20/12 05:59 PM

I mean, I'll look on the forums and they always look down on English dubbing, hating on the English VAs, and the list goes on.
Posted by: Hobby Ninja

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/20/12 06:18 PM

Just notice that the people who raise the most cane are the least intellectual.

On another forum we have had a discussion on this phenomena. There are haters that love to hate. It's a waste of energy and time to behave that way or to converse with them. They have the personality type where they think they have to control the conversation.

I ignore them. Why let them ruin my day.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/02/12 11:49 AM

Anime Today Animepedia Addendum:

"Don't feed the trolls."

Originally Posted By: Manhiem
If you think someone is acting like a troll, the last thing you should do is feed them. If you do, then like a stray cat, they'll just keep coming back for more.
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/02/12 04:14 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
Anime Today Animepedia Addendum:

"Don't feed the trolls."

Originally Posted By: Manhiem
If you think someone is acting like a troll, the last thing you should do is feed them. If you do, then like a stray cat, they'll just keep coming back for more.

*grin*
Posted by: Gevin

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/02/12 04:21 PM

As far as I'm aware, an Otaku is only considered a person with an anime obsession in America. In Japan an Otaku can be a person with an obsession of anything. Typically such an obsession that causes the person to become a recluse from normal society. For a good point of reference, check out the weirdos in Princess Jellyfish. ;P
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/02/12 04:27 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
Anime Today Animepedia Addendum:

"Don't feed the trolls."

Originally Posted By: Manhiem
If you think someone is acting like a troll, the last thing you should do is feed them. If you do, then like a stray cat, they'll just keep coming back for more.

grin I changed the name grin
(Fun was had, my pionts been made, I'm content)

Posted by: zrdb

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/02/12 09:16 PM

I hate the word otaku-I love anime but don't call me no stinking otaku.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/02/12 10:13 PM

I don't know if I would be considered an anime otaku or not. I guess I wouldn't care if anyone were to call me that. I do watch anime almost every day. It gives me happiness and pleasure in my life. If I'm not avid enough to be considered an otaku, phew; and if I am... c'est la vie.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/16/12 01:41 PM

"Shiny Syndrome"

A behavior pattern similar to ADD that exists in anime. This condition is apparently more prevelant in females, with particular regard to female ninjas. Anyone afflicted with shiny syndrome can have their attention diverted by the slightest distraction. The bane to all those with shiny syndrome is the kitty. It is the single most powerful known distraction to shiny syndrome sufferers. If someone with shiny syndrome happens to espy a kitty, it's as if they were struck by a mindwipe. They have blinders on and can see only the kitty. The only avenue of thought open to them is... the kitty. There is no known cure for shiny syndrome. It should be noted that shiny syndrome is an all too real affliction and is no laughing matter. Numerous support groups have arisen to aid sufferers such as Mario (those d??? coins) in controlling their shiny syndrome (to little or no effect) and to cope with prejudice and ridicule.

example:
Originally Posted By: name withheld
You know what's sad about my unwatched pile;
I've got stuff I've bought almost three years ago sitting in it.
blush
I try my best to watch it all...but I suffer from "shiny syndrome" I see somthing that intrests me an-
Ooooohhh! KITTY!
(runs off to chase after the cat.)
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/16/12 02:03 PM

"Completist Syndrome"

Completist syndrome is one of anime world's most prevelant afflictions. Up to 75% of today's anime fans suffer from completist syndrome, some reports state as high as 90%; staggering numbers to be sure. It is a misunderstood and underestimated malady. Most anime fans suffering from completist syndrome aren't aware of it or aren't willing to admit it. They will often refer to it as "completist tendencies" or say things like "I wanted to order the third series from the other side of the world for well over quadruple it's value." Sugar coating it does not supersede diagnosis people. Common signs of completist syndrome are multiple versions of the same item (i.e. individual volumes sitting on a shelf right next to the complete series), the same title in multiple formats (i.e. owns the anime, video games, manga, figures, and assorted paraphernalia), and multiple back-up hard drives filled with fansubs or shelving units filled to capacity with hard to find items and imports. Medical professionals are in agreement: "Just because you have the first five volumes, doesn't mean you have to have the OVA collection." Like any addiction, understanding is possibly the best medicine.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/16/12 02:46 PM

"Crappack"

Def.: A DVD case that stores all of it's DVD's stacked on top of each other on a single post. They are most commonly found in bargain editions and rereleases. Despite consumer outrage, this packaging medium is still commonly found today. The crappack is far and away the single most unanimoulsy hated DVD packaging system. Irregardless of model (i.e. slimpack, chipboard, flipcase), all other models are superior.

Syn.: Stackpack

Ant.: Case that doesn't suck.
Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/16/12 04:01 PM

I have the shiny one, but it can happen with anything. This causes problems with anime viewing. I wish I could use my video game strategy of routing, but trying to watch 5 animes all together can get hard. Plus with anime I'll often times just want to marathon shows.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 07/25/12 09:31 PM

ANN lexicon
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 08/07/12 09:20 PM

One of my faves: Genki Girl
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 08/07/12 09:33 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
One of my faves: Genki Girl

How about...
Manic Pixie Dream Girl

"She'll liven up your life whether you like it or not!"
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 08/07/12 10:36 PM

The epitome of genki girl. I'm an airplane, wheee!
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 10/01/12 10:59 AM

"Arrival Storm"

def.:The aquisition of an uncharacteristically large amount of anime or other related items in one shipment or place. Usually marked by a very large package on the doorstep or in the mailbox. Arrival Storms of high magnitude have been known to damage and/or destroy mailbox's of substandard construction.
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 10/01/12 11:03 AM

Originally Posted By: kiku
"Arrival Storm"

def.:The aquisition of an uncharacteristically large amount of anime or other related items in one shipment or place. Usually marked by a very large package on the doorstep or in the mailbox. Arrival Storms of high magnitude have been known to damage and/or destroy mailbox's of substandard construction.

If that's the case, it's Storms around here all the time grin
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 10/01/12 11:09 AM

It's good to be in the Eye Of The Storm.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 10/01/12 11:41 AM

"Eye Of The Storm"

def.: The convergence of two or more "Arrival Storm" fronts. The "Eye Of The Storm" is characterized by the arrival of multiple large anime or other related items shipments in a short span of time. Some Eyes Of The Storm can last for an indefinite amount of time and are purported to be related to geographical location; although it's been theorized that financial forces also guide the movement of Arrival Storm fronts.
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 10/01/12 01:28 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
"Eye Of The Storm"

def.: The convergence of two or more "Arrival Storm" fronts. The "Eye Of The Storm" is characterized by the arrival of multiple large anime or other related items shipments in a short span of time. Some Eyes Of The Storm can last for an indefinite amount of time and are purported to be related to geographical location; although it's been theorized that financial forces also guide the movement of Arrival Storm fronts.

Been there Many-A-Time as wellÖ.
RightStuf and ether fye or Amazon all arrive same time.( sometimes all three )

I "know" my Mailman hates me because of all of the Packages, fye and Amazon packages would arrive with loose DVDís. ( all the time ) I know he does it.
( Because all the loose DVD's defies the law of Averages )

Every once in a Blue Moon it happens with RightStuf, thatís because they pack their stuf so
Well, itís very hard for him to get a Disc to pop loose.


P.S. I love this thread youíve got going here kikuÖ
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 10/01/12 10:58 PM

Yes... yes... it is a valuable resource for information and nonsense. You (and anybody else) are more than welcome to contribute to the Anime/Manga subculture terminology, be it informative or nonsensical.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 11/14/12 05:46 PM

Just trying to get my Dere's straight...

"Don't forget the ever helpful Wikipedia's Glossary Of Anime And Manga"

My take on it:

Tsundere: Cold to warm.
Kuudere: Cool to warm.
Dandere: Tepid to warm.
Yandere: Jealous and overprotective.
Dere Dere: Head over heels.

Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 12/05/12 01:08 PM

I thought that I would repost a couple of the resources found earlier in this topic for ease of use:

Anime News Network Lexicon

Wikipedia Glossary of anime and manga
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 12/05/12 04:31 PM

BTW I finally made a donation to Wiki today. I feel a lot better now... considering I use their services on a daily basis. Not to mention they are quite possibly the world's largest repository of free information to people.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 12/13/12 02:34 AM

"Sexaroid"

An android, generally female in appearance, designed for sex. Examples of Sexaroids can be found in anime such as Ghost In The Shell, The Galaxy Railways, and Bubblegum Crisis.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 02/01/13 02:37 AM

As imparted by joelgundam01 in the "What manga are you reading/just finished reading?" topic in the "General Manga & Light Novel Discussion" forum:

Onii-san = Big Brother
Onee-san = Big Sister
Posted by: joelgundam01

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 02/01/13 12:52 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
As imparted by joelgundam01 in the "What manga are you reading/just finished reading?" topic in the "General Manga & Light Novel Discussion" forum:

Onii-san = Big Brother
Onee-san = Big Sister

Actually that's not 100% accurate. In the case of the post I made in the manga thread, my comment was indeed 100% true. However, that's not always the case.

Technically "Nii" is Big Brother and "Nee" is Big Sister. San of course is just a standard honorific, but "chan" and "kun" could also be used.

Onii and Onee are used when the younger sibling has high respect to their older brother/sister or the older sibling has a high status/reputation in society. For example, a noble or royal will call their older siblings "Onii" and "Onee" along with the "sama" honorific at the end.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 02/01/13 11:14 PM

Thanks for elaborating joelgundam01. Would you, by chance; have more information regarding the suffixes (honorifics) -san, -chan, & -kun? What sets them apart? I'm aware the -sama is used when referring to someone whom one holds in high regard, or is their senior. The other three aforementioned honorifics, as you mentioned; seem to be synonymous. If there was a more specific meaning to each, I'd love to know; especially considering how often -san, -chan, & -kun are seen in anime.
Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 02/01/13 11:34 PM

From what I have seen. Now I may be wrong with this, but "chan" seems to be more for someone talking to someone they are older then. Like the onii-sama or onee-sama would refer to the younger person by "insert name"-chan.

kun and san I am not too sure about yet.
Posted by: joelgundam01

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 02/02/13 12:18 AM

Originally Posted By: Cheap One
From what I have seen. Now I may be wrong with this, but "chan" seems to be more for someone talking to someone they are older then. Like the onii-sama or onee-sama would refer to the younger person by "insert name"-chan.

kun and san I am not too sure about yet.


Kun, san and chan can be used in many ways. It's true that chan is usually used for people that are younger, but I have read some titles that have used it for older characters. Usually it's for a joke between friends and siblings that act childish, but I have seen Onee-chan and Onii-chan used a few times now.
Posted by: joelgundam01

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 02/02/13 12:28 AM

Originally Posted By: kiku
Thanks for elaborating joelgundam01. Would you, by chance; have more information regarding the suffixes (honorifics) -san, -chan, & -kun?


San - Is a really generic honorific and it's a really safe one to use if your not sure which honorific to use. It's pretty much the equivalent to Mr, Mrs, Miss and Ms all in one.

Chan - Usually used to address young girls, but can be used occasionally for young boys too. Sometimes it can be used for older people that act childish.

Kun - Usually used to address young boys, but can be used to address older men as well. It's very rare for a female to be called kun.

Sama - Usually used for nobles, aristocrats and royalty. However, like you said. It can also be used for someone that has high respect for someone. Almost to a level where the person is worshiping them.

Dono - Used for people that are the head of a business or household.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 02/02/13 04:26 PM

Thanks again joelgundam01.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 02/21/13 10:43 AM

Pseud-OCD (aka pseudo obcessive compulsive disorder)

def. - The mental state of requiring order, for reasons that can seem incoherent. Unlike OCD, Pseud-OCD doesn't require said order to prevent a nervous break; it just really pisses us off when we can't have our way.

see also: Completist Tendencies/Completist Syndrome
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/04/13 10:19 PM

GAR: (As taken from the "Figures" topic)

def.: A man that posesses so much masculinity and virility that any other men around him simply all look like pansies.

ex.: Duke Togo from The Professional, Jotaro Jostar from Jojo's Bizarre Adventure, Kenshiro from Fist Of The North Star.
Posted by: Stefanie

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/05/13 01:01 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
GAR: (As taken from the "Figures" topic)

ex.: Ed's Father in Cowboy Bebop

ex.: Shungai So in The Story of Saiunkoku
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/05/13 06:15 PM

Ed is so lovable.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/13/13 10:55 PM

"Trap" - A character that appears to be, dresses like, and/or talks like a woman; but is in fact a man.

"Reverse Trap" - A character that appears to be, dresses like, and/or talks like a man; but is in fact a woman.
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/14/13 09:32 AM

Originally Posted By: kiku
"Trap" - A character that appears to be, dresses like, and/or talks like a woman; but is in fact a man.

"Reverse Trap" - A character that appears to be, dresses like, and/or talks like a man; but is in fact a woman.

Oh I see, so in Return of the Jedi, thatís what Admiral Akbar meant.
He was talking about the Emperor, who was in the Dead Star ( mark II ) at the time. laugh
( his outfit looked like a dress to me )

edit:I know, lame jokeÖ crazy

Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/14/13 11:18 AM

Originally Posted By: BWBODDY

Oh I see, so in Return of the Jedi, thatís what Admiral Akbar meant.
He was talking about the Emperor, who was in the Dead Star ( mark II ) at the time. laugh
( his outfit looked like a dress to me )



Everytime I watch anime with a trap I always say that line.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/14/13 11:22 AM

Tee hee.
Posted by: Stefanie

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/13 09:37 AM

So, why wouldn't they simply be called "Traps" either way (M-F or F-M)? To me, "Reverse Traps" would mean that the characters in question turned out to be the sexes they outwardly appeared as, even though other characters (and/or the audience) thought they were traps (presumably, because of misinformation or disinformation).

For example, in Gankutsuou: The Count of Monte Cristo, we never really know whether Peppo is male or female. All we have is the word of the unreliable Count.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/13 11:03 AM

Good point Stefanie. We could come up with our own name for said terminology...
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/13 12:09 PM

Maybe... Pseudo-Trap?
Posted by: SD Maruko-kun

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/13 01:50 PM

Originally Posted By: Stefanie
So, why wouldn't they simply be called "Traps" either way (M-F or F-M)? To me, "Reverse Traps" would mean that the characters in question turned out to be the sexes they outwardly appeared as, even though other characters (and/or the audience) thought they were traps (presumably, because of misinformation or disinformation).

Well, I guess the answer to that question is probably something like: "because most anime is predominantly aimed at males, there's some gender discrimination w.r.t. naming things"...

Likewise there's also "harem", which is "boy surrounded by girls" and "reverse-harem", which is "girl surrounded by boys"... :-|
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/13 02:28 PM

So is "boy surrounded by traps" trap harem?
Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/13 02:51 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
So is "boy surrounded by traps" trap harem?


No that is a Sausage Fest wink
Posted by: sevi

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/13 04:44 PM

Originally Posted By: Cheap One
Originally Posted By: kiku
So is "boy surrounded by traps" trap harem?


No that is a Sausage Fest wink


Nope. That would be called Yaoi, hun wink

Although in Oresama Teacher, Yui (male) tells Mafuyu (female) that he won't become a part of her harem. So maybe the whole "reverse harem" idea is purely an American thing?
Posted by: SD Maruko-kun

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/13 06:27 PM

Originally Posted By: sevi
So maybe the whole "reverse harem" idea is purely an American thing?

Most of these terms are probably "western world only" in their meanings.
Heck, from the Japanese point of view Bambi is an anime, while in the western world we use anime to specifically refer to Japanese animation...

(AniDB, Anime-planet and probably also other database sites do have a "reverse harem" tag)
Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/13 08:57 PM

Originally Posted By: sevi
Nope. That would be called Yaoi, hun wink


I know, I was just joking.

Originally Posted By: sevi
So maybe the whole "reverse harem" idea is purely an American thing?


Harem really just means Forbidden Place/Room. It was the term given to the place where females stayed in the Middle East. So a reverse harem does kind of make sense to be a place mainly filled with males.
Posted by: sevi

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/15/13 10:26 PM

Originally Posted By: Cheap One
Originally Posted By: sevi
Nope. That would be called Yaoi, hun wink


I know, I was just joking.

Originally Posted By: sevi
So maybe the whole "reverse harem" idea is purely an American thing?


Harem really just means Forbidden Place/Room. It was the term given to the place where females stayed in the Middle East. So a reverse harem does kind of make sense to be a place mainly filled with males.


So then Ooku: The Inner Chamber would be the most apt "reverse harem" series ever as features an actual male harem. And also I knew you were kidding, I was just kidding you back smile
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/16/13 12:29 AM

Ha ha! ROFL! It's nice to have this activity in this topic. We need MOAR anime and manga subculture terminology.

MOAR

def.: Used in place of the word "more" to emphasize it, and to sound like a pirate.
Posted by: Stefanie

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/18/13 03:44 PM

Originally Posted By: Stefanie
So, why wouldn't they simply be called "Traps" either way (M-F or F-M)? To me, "Reverse Traps" would mean that the characters in question turned out to be the sexes they outwardly appeared as, even though other characters (and/or the audience) thought they were traps (presumably, because of misinformation or disinformation).
Originally Posted By: SD Maruko-kun
Well, I guess the answer to that question is probably something like: "because most anime is predominantly aimed at males, there's some gender discrimination w.r.t. naming things"...

My question was mainly rhetorical, but that's exactly right. What's reverse to one person might be regular to another, and there's certainly a cultural bias. That being said, my favorite traps are probably Sherry in E's Otherwise, followed by Nuriko in Fushigi Yugi. Neither character's secret lasts for very long, but each one is loveable in her own way.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/18/13 10:03 PM

Is anybody else wondering how Stefanie did that?
Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/18/13 10:33 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
Is anybody else wondering how Stefanie did that?


Sadly no. If you go to the full reply. You just change your text color to white. She knows we all have white backgrounds, so it "hides" the text.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/18/13 11:00 PM

Oh, I see. Thank you Cheap One. whistle
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/18/13 11:07 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
Oh, I see. Thank you Cheap One. whistle

I hope everyone who reads her Post realizes they can just click on Quote and read what she wrote.
Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/18/13 11:26 PM

Originally Posted By: BWBODDY
Originally Posted By: kiku
Oh, I see. Thank you Cheap One. whistle

I hope everyone who reads her Post realizes they can just click on Quote and read what she wrote.


All you really have to do is click on the text. I go to another board that uses that trick for spoilers. So I am very use to doing it already.
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/18/13 11:48 PM

Originally Posted By: Cheap One
Originally Posted By: BWBODDY
Originally Posted By: kiku
Oh, I see. Thank you Cheap One. whistle

I hope everyone who reads her Post realizes they can just click on Quote and read what she wrote.


All you really have to do is click on the text. I go to another board that uses that trick for spoilers. So I am very use to doing it already.

Oh... right, right grin
hold left button down and slide over the word
Posted by: Stefanie

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 03/19/13 11:50 AM

Just highlight it with your cursor, and you'll see the white text. Using the spoiler tag creates a whole separate paragraph, which wasn't necessary for so few words.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 04/09/13 05:39 PM

As quoted from Gevin:

"Sh*t & Tit distraction" def.: The use of fanservice, such as scantily clad characters; to obfuscate the lack of well developed storyline, pacing, characters, etc...
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 04/26/13 09:58 AM

def.: Ahoge (as taken from the Urban Dictionary )

Literally, ďstupid hairĒ in japanese. A single (usually short and fat) lock of hair that sticks out of an anime characterís head. The character is usually stupid in some way, but there are enough exceptions that this isnít a rule. Example characters include Himeko and Me-tan. To be differentiated from antenna hair, which is two or more thin locks of hair as opposed to only one.

Rebecca grabs a hold of Himeko's ahoge and pulls it out.
Posted by: zrdb

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/11/13 05:05 AM

Originally Posted By: Gevin
As far as I'm aware, an Otaku is only considered a person with an anime obsession in America. In Japan an Otaku can be a person with an obsession of anything. Typically such an obsession that causes the person to become a recluse from normal society. For a good point of reference, check out the weirdos in Princess Jellyfish. ;P


I HATE the term "otaku"-a literal translation is a fanatical fan-a stalker in some cases. To me it's just plain creepy-I much prefer the term "anime aficionado".
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/11/13 11:12 AM

Originally Posted By: zrdb
Originally Posted By: Gevin
As far as I'm aware, an Otaku is only considered a person with an anime obsession in America. In Japan an Otaku can be a person with an obsession of anything. Typically such an obsession that causes the person to become a recluse from normal society. For a good point of reference, check out the weirdos in Princess Jellyfish. ;P


I HATE the term "otaku"-a literal translation is a fanatical fan-a stalker in some cases. To me it's just plain creepy-I much prefer the term "anime connoisseur".

How about "Animaniacs" laugh
Posted by: zrdb

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/12/13 09:26 PM

See my edit to the originial post.
Posted by: sevi

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/12/13 10:39 PM

Originally Posted By: zrdb


I HATE the term "otaku"-a literal translation is a fanatical fan-a stalker in some cases. To me it's just plain creepy-I much prefer the term "anime aficionado".


Wouldn't that just lead to bad AA meeting jokes though? whistle
Posted by: zrdb

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/15/13 09:59 PM

Who cares? I'd rather be addicted to anime than other harmful things.
Posted by: sevi

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/15/13 10:22 PM

Originally Posted By: zrdb
Who cares? I'd rather be addicted to anime than other harmful things.


I was joking with ya, zrdb. I'm sure you feel about the same about the term "otaku" as I do "fujoshi". Although at one point I did almost get a wristband that said "Anime: Crack is Cheaper". Didn't wanna sound like I was promoting drugs though.
>.<
Posted by: zrdb

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/17/13 02:51 AM

Yeah-I read that-problem is anime can be a lot more expensive than crack or whatever-I shudder when I think how much I've spent on anime over the years. LOL
Posted by: SD Maruko-kun

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/17/13 04:07 AM

Originally Posted By: zrdb
Yeah-I read that-problem is anime can be a lot more expensive than crack or whatever-I shudder when I think how much I've spent on anime over the years. LOL

Yeah, I still need to up my insurance: anime/manga/merchandise make up more than 50% of the value of the items in my apartement... crazy
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/18/13 12:36 AM

I don't think that my renter's insurance is adequate for the value of my collection either (personal value that is). However, I don't really want to up my rates either. It's more of a safety net than anything.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/18/13 01:16 PM

Mailstorm

def.: A large shipment of mail, often from multiple sources; occuring on the same day. Usually refers to anime, but often includes shipments of manga, video games, movies etc... Oft confused with, and likened to maelstrom. Unlike the maelstrom, the mailstorm is the harbinger of happiness and glee.
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/18/13 07:51 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
Mailstorm

def.: A large shipment of mail, often from multiple sources; occuring on the same day. Usually refers to anime, but often includes shipments of manga, video games, movies etc... Oft confused with, and likened to maelstrom. Unlike the maelstrom, the mailstorm is the harbinger of happiness and glee.

crazy I've had many of those crazy
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/19/13 12:07 AM

Originally Posted By: kiku
Mailstorm

def.: A large shipment of mail, often from multiple sources; occuring on the same day. Usually refers to anime, but often includes shipments of manga, video games, movies etc... Oft confused with, and likened to maelstrom. Unlike the maelstrom, the mailstorm is the harbinger of happiness and glee.
Synonym: Arrival Storm (from page 8 of this topic).
Posted by: zrdb

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 05/27/13 06:09 PM

I try to keep my incoming anime tide minimal to avoid overfilling the package locker.
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 07/05/13 03:23 AM

Megganeko

Originally Posted By: Manhiem
Megganeko is a combination of megane ("glasses") and ko ("child" or "girl"). Hence, meganeko is shorthand for "glasses wearing girl".
Posted by: BWBODDY

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 07/05/13 09:24 AM

Originally Posted By: kiku
Megganeko

Originally Posted By: Manhiem
Megganeko is a combination of megane ("glasses") and ko ("child" or "girl"). Hence, meganeko is shorthand for "glasses wearing girl".

OIC laugh
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 10/25/13 09:51 AM

Manservice

def.: Fanservice for the ladies. The feminine fanservice. Fanservice geared towards women.
Posted by: sevi

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 10/25/13 07:51 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
Manservice

def.: Fanservice for the ladies. The feminine fanservice. Fanservice geared towards women.


Example: Here, Squalo and Lussuria are providing Manservice wink / jk
(There's nothing pervy in the link - no worries,k)
Posted by: sevi

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 11/13/13 09:29 PM

Otokonoko :
Anime or manga featuring cross-dressing males aimed at a male audience, also known as Josou or literally "women's clothes"; can feature male x female or male x male relationships.
Examples- Maria Holic, My Cute Crossdresser
Posted by: kiku

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 11/13/13 09:32 PM

I, Me, Strawberry Eggs?
Posted by: sevi

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 11/13/13 11:06 PM

Originally Posted By: kiku
I, Me, Strawberry Eggs?


From what I remember, yes smile
Posted by: Cheap One

Re: Anime/Manga subculture terminology - 11/13/13 11:28 PM

Sevi, have you seen the Outbreak Company episode where the two Japanese characters go over Otaku terms? I think you would really enjoy that segment.