Emma: A Victorian Romance

Emma: A Victorian Romance Season 1 - Litebox

In 19th-century London, class lines are sharply drawn, and the social standing to which people are born dictates the path their lives will follow. Emma, an honest and hardworking young maid, never felt her place in life to be a burden. But then she met William, a member of the gentry and the eldest son of a wealthy family. His warm smile and earnest affection threaten to capture her heart... but can love truly conquer all?

Contains all 12 episodes of the first season.

Features

Character Biographies, Textless Opening, Textless Closing, Japanese Promotional Commercial, Japanese TV Promotional Spots, Japanese DVD Commercials, US Season One and Season Two Trailers, Previews

  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot

Emma: A Victorian Romance Season 2 - Litebox

In the faraway village of Haworth, a new chapter in Emma's life has begun. Now employed by the wealthy Molders family, Emma has resolved to put the past behind her. She'll have to adjust to a new house, a charming (but eccentric) new mistress, and a host of fellow servants, some with buried pasts of their own.

Meanwhile, back in London, William is doing his best to uphold his father's wishes as the Jones family heir, but try as he might, he can't forget Emma. Yet, whenever he feels at his worst, Eleanor is always there to comfort him with a warm, shy smile. Could the answer to his broken heart be right before his eyes?

Contains all 12 episodes of the second act plus "Episode 0: Intermission," a recap/preview that aired prior to the start of the Season 2 telecast in Japan.

Features

Textless Opening and Closing, Japanese Commercials, Trailers.

  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot
  • Emma: A Victorian Romance Screenshot

News

December 12, 2012

Value-Priced DVD Set for EMMA’s Second Season Scheduled for April 2013!

We’re pleased to announce Emma: A Victorian Romance - Season 2 will be available as a Litebox-style DVD set on April 2, 2013! This new set repackages the entire 12-episode second (and final!) season of Emma in a single DVD keepcase. It will also feature Japanese audio, English subtitles and English on-screen translations, along with the on-disc extras from the previous release. Pre-order it today!

October 17, 2012

Value-Priced DVD Set for EMMA’s First Season Scheduled for Feb. 2013!

We’re pleased to announce Emma: A Victorian Romance - Season 1 will be available as a Litebox-style DVD set on February 5, 2013… just in time for Valentine’s Day! This new set repackages the entire 12-episode first season of Emma in a single DVD keepcase. It will also feature Japanese audio, English subtitles and English on-screen translations, along with the on-disc extras from the previous release. Pre-order it today!

November 13, 2008

EMMA - Season 2 Now Available, Named AoD Pick of the Week! Our awesome friends over at AnimeOnDVD at Mania.com celebrated this week's release of the EMMA: A Victorian Romance - Season 2 DVD Collection by voting it the "Pick of the Week"! (Thank you!)

October 21, 2008

EMMA: A Victorian Romance - Season 2 Pushed to November 11, 2008 Shipping delays have forced us to reschedule the EMMA: A Victorian Romance - Season 2 DVD Collection, by two weeks to a new release date of Tuesday, November 11, 2008. We know a lot of you have been waiting for the conclusion of Emma's story, and we appreciate both your support and continued patience. She'll be on her way to you VERY soon!

August 5, 2008

The Season 2 DVD Collection, available October 28, 2008, will include… - All 12 episodes of the series “Second Act” - “Episode 0: Intermission” - A 48-page “Victorian Gazette” book, featuring artwork and illustrations from the series, plus an interview with Kaoru Mori, creator of the award-winning Emma manga. Order Season 1 (Now Available!) and  pre-order Season 2 today!

July 24, 2008

Important Season 2 Info, Emma in the News and Manga Previews! The first 1,000 fans to pre-order the EMMA – Season 2 DVD Collection from RightStuf.com as of 11:59 p.m. CDT on July 31, 2008, will be eligible to have their names appear in the DVD credits for the box set. Plus, be sure to hit the “Reviews” section for the critical reaction to the EMMA – Season 1 DVD Collection and to check out the “Manga” section for extensive previews of the EMMA manga from our friends at CMX Manga!

July 3, 2008

Congratulations to the winners of our contest with CMX Manga, the North American publishers of the Emma manga! The Grand Prize winner – Amber A of Gorham, Maine – will soon receive an exclusive, high-quality replica of Emma artwork, illustrated by Kaoru Mori and personalized with her name!  And the runners up – Angela P, of Luray, Virginia; Maria H of Watsonville, California; and Justin E of Laurelton, New York – will each receive a prize package that contains the first three volumes of the EMMA manga!

June 24, 2008

The first season of EMMA: A Victorian Romance officially streets today, and the readers of AnimeOnDVD.com celebrated by voting the season 1 box set as the “AnimeOnDVD.com Pick of the Week!” (Thanks!) Also, if you’d like to preview the series, pick up the current issue of Otaku USA! The June 2008 DVD sampler includes the very first episode of EMMA – but this particular issue will only be on newsstands a little while longer!

May 28, 2008

The EMMA: A Victorian Romance site is now live! Be sure to check out the NEW trailer for Season 1 and the contest, held together with our friends over at CMX Manga, for an exclusive high-quality replica of EMMA artwork, illustrated by Kaoru Mori and volumes of the EMMA manga. There’s much, much more – including downloadable avatars and desktop art – so please take some time to look around and explore!

April 29, 2008

The first subtitled episode of EMMA: A Victorian Romance is featured on the DVD sampler that’s included with the June 2008 issue of OTAKU USA! Additionally, the review inside the magazine says “If you’re into well-done romance and detailed historical series, or at least willing to take a chance on such things, there’s really no way you can go wrong with this release. Here’s hoping it finds its following here.”

April 15, 2008

More enthusiastic words about EMMA, via a two-spread feature PiQ Magazine’s June 2008 issue: “With its affecting characters, understated artwork, and meticulous historical accuracy, Emma’s treatment of the gap between rich and poor in Victorian England is quietly revolutionary.”

April 4, 2008

PiQ Magazine calls EMMA “one to keep an eye on” in its May 2008 issue! (It’s in the “Peek” section at the very front of the magazine and includes a nice shot of Emma and William!)

April 3, 2008

New York Comic Con will present the convention premiere of EMMA: A Victorian Romance at 12 noon on Saturday, April 19, 2008, in room 1E04 of the Jacob Javits Center.

March 25, 2008

The Spring 2008 edition of Right Stuf’s Anime Catalog features a hardcopy of our exclusive interview with EMMA’s creator, the very talented Kaoru Mori! (Pssst! The interview can be found on this site in the “News” section!) Check out the catalog!

March 20, 2008

We’re excited to reveal the preliminary box art and announce additional extras for the EMMA: A Victorian Romance – Season 1 DVD Collection, which is scheduled for release on June 24, 2008!

In addition to the previously announced 96-page “Victorian Gazette” book, the EMMA – Season 1 DVD Collection will include character biographies, the series’ textless opening and textless closing, a Japanese promotional commercial, Japanese TV spots promoting the series, the Japanese commercials for the DVDs, the U.S. Season One and Season Two trailers and Right Stuf/Nozomi Entertainment trailers.

February 13, 2008

We have two announcements about the EMMA: A Victorian Romance – Season 1 DVD Collection, which is scheduled for release on June 24, 2008:

- The Season 1 DVD Collection – with the anime’s entire 12-episode first season – will include a 96-page “Victorian Gazette,” featuring background information and illustrations that explore the Victorian era depicted in the series, from period fashions and travel in England to architecture and day-to-day life. This book also includes a full glossary, with in-depth, historical explanations, plus comments and comics by Kaoru Mori, the creator of the EMMA manga. This exclusive extra is a compilation of the booklets that were previously only available with the Japanese limited-edition DVD releases of EMMA.

- The first 1,000 anime fans to pre-order the Season 1 DVD Collection from RightStuf.com before 11:59 p.m. CST on Monday, February 18, 2008 will be recognized by name in a “special thanks” section of the DVD credits for the series’ first box set. [Deadline passed!]

February 4, 2008

ICV2 name EMMA one of the “top anime launches” for May and June 2008 in its just released Guide to Anime & Manga (#51)!

February 1, 2008

Be sure to check out the EMMA article – subtitled “Maidly mayhem in the Mori manner” – in the final issue of Newtype USA (February 2008), i.e., the one with the first episode preview!  

January 30, 2008

We have a “valentine” for anime fans: An early cut of the first subtitled episode of EMMA: A VICTORIAN ROMANCE appears on Newtype USA’s February 2008 DVD sampler! PLEASE NOTE: Although this “first look” utilizes letterboxed footage, both of the upcoming season box sets will feature the series in its intended anamorphic widescreen (16:9) presentation.  

January 16, 2008

We’re pleased to unveil the first trailer / promotional video for EMMA: A VICTORIAN ROMANCE, now playing at emma.rightstuf.com!

Reviews

"I am in love.” - Anime News Network’s Shelf Life

"Anyone who can make it through the series' slow emotional boil, pregnant moments of silent portent, light, soft humor and pitch-perfect, forlornly hopeful conclusion, and still grumble about its dublessness is in serious need of hug therapy.” - Anime News Network

"…if you’re looking for a unique anime with some real heart then definitely give this one a shot.”   “Highly recommended.” - DVD Talk’s Anime Talk

"It's PBS meets anime in the best way with the latest offering from Right Stuf.” - Detroit News Anime Blog

"…completely captivates and entrances.” “Highly recommended.” - AnimeOnDVD.com

"If you’re into well-done romance and detailed historical series, or at least willing to take a chance on such things, there’s really no way you can go wrong with this release. Here’s hoping it finds its following here.”” - Otaku USA – June 2008

"With its affecting characters, understated artwork, and meticulous historical accuracy, Emma’s treatment of the gap between rich and poor in Victorian England is quietly revolutionary.” - PiQ Magazine – June 2008

"so touching and tender that it’s almost addictive”
“simply charming” “June cannot come fast enough for this release”
- AnimeOnDVD.com

A "masterpiece that shows the true potential of anime as an international art form” - Anime News Network

Interview With Kaoru Mori

This interview originally appeared in the 2008 Right Stuf catalog.

Nineteenth-century London may seem an odd setting for a Japanese anime, but for the tender love story of Emma: A Victorian Romance, there’s no better age. Victorian England was an era when new ideas were beginning to revolutionize everyday life, but traditional attitudes still staunchly held sway in social matters. So when romance unexpectedly blooms between an impoverished maid and a wealthy young man, they quickly discover just how deep society’s disapproval can run.

The Emma anime was based on the original manga series of the same name by the talented Kaoru Mori, and Nozomi Entertainment is delighted to present a rare and exclusive interview with the Emma manga-ka herself.

It is widely known that you are quite a fan of “all things English.” When did your fascination with Victorian England take hold? What is it you find so appealing about this culture?

I’m knowledgeable about the lifestyle and culture of the late Victorian era, but I’m not an expert on England. I wasn’t specifically interested in Victorian England at first, but that was the era that appealed to me most.

I used to read foreign picture and children’s books when I was a child, because I liked to read. Every now and then, a maid would appear in those books and I became fascinated and curious about them.

I also think it’s because my parents were in the interior design business. I really liked buildings and I enjoyed looking through the imported wallpaper and curtain catalogs. The catalogs would have sample pictures of already-decorated rooms and I was drawn to the Victorian English designs. I used to imagine a maid working in her black and white uniform in a mansion with beautifully decorated rooms.

Answering your question about what appeals to me the most about Victorian England is difficult. I feel like the more I learn about it, the more I become closer to it, like a good friend. I love everything about it, both the good and bad aspects. I guess if I had to pick one thing, it would be the culture of the working class, because maids were the first thing I became interested in.

How did your interest in the culture and time period lead to the creation of Emma and its “world”?

I’m not sure if I’m answering your question correctly, but I was inspired to create Emma because that’s all that was on my mind. The “World of Emma” wasn’t fully realized from the start. It took shape as I started to draw and study the era along the way.

What kind of research did you undertake in your efforts to make Emma as historically accurate as possible? Why do you feel this is important?

I had some knowledge about the Victorian Era from reading and watching things related to that era, but I was only able to afford research materials after I was paid for the manuscripts. When the serialization began, I was working feverishly and I didn’t have much money so I wasn’t able to fully research everything beforehand. All I had on my mind was “I love this era! I want to draw it!” and that’s how it all started. That's why there are several historical inaccuracies in the beginning. I amended things along the way but I left some inaccuracies as is because it was too closely tied to the story.

I enjoy drawing something historically accurate. I believe it’s a way to show respect to the people who lived in that country and era.

Many of the manga and anime that have been brought to the U.S. feature maids in “moe,” “fan service,” or “strictly comical” contexts. What was your motivation behind making Emma a lush, believable tale?

I can’t speak on behalf of anyone on why maids are shown in “moe” or “fan service” contexts, but personally I think it’s because they don’t really understand what a maid actually is. They just think the outfit is cute.

Just looking at the maid outfit, I think it’s wonderful too, but I was drawn to that profession and the era in which that profession existed. I wanted to create a story in that historical context, thinking that Emma’s story might have really happened.

Do you see any parallels between the English society you depict in Emma and Japanese society today?

I often think about how some things never change. Lifestyle and customs may have changed, but anything that has to do with human emotions doesn’t change, no matter what country or era we live in.

The cartoons from Punch [a magazine from the Victorian era] still make me laugh today, and even though a Japanese artist created Emma, people from foreign countries tell me they enjoy my work.

As a manga-ka, what is it like to see one of your works adapted into an anime? How involved were you in the process? Were you surprised by any part of the process? Have you had the chance to view the finished anime adaptation?

It was a strange feeling to know my work was being animated. It was also embarrassing, because my fantasies and favorite things are woven into my work. On the other hand, I was very happy when I learned that people enjoyed my work so much they requested it be turned into an anime.

The only thing I did for the anime was lend my research materials and answer questions about the characters. A lady named Riko Murakami was in charge of doing all the period research and the anime staff worked extremely hard, so I was able to enjoy the show as a viewer.

I didn’t know much about the process of creating an anime, so it was full of surprises. I knew it took a lot of people to make an anime, but I simply thought everyone just did their part.

I didn’t realize how intense the creative process is. Everyone is pushed to their limit. If one person goes down, the next person takes over. If there are a hundred staffers, those hundred staffers will work to their limit.

I enjoyed the anime so much. I was anxious to receive the sample episode every week. I hope everyone enjoys the show as much as I did.

Emma is a very strong-willed female character, and many fans admire this about her. Who or what was your inspiration for Emma? Did you have a preconceived notion of what type of character you wanted Emma to be?

Emma isn’t based on anyone specific. Rather, she's based on what I find attractive about a person.

Emma was my first serialized manga and I was just learning how hard it was to draw a manga on a monthly schedule. I was inexperienced, but I knew I wanted to create a character that I would look forward to drawing every month, and a character the readers would find appealing.

It’s embarrassing because she’s too perfect, but I still enjoy drawing her. She's one of my favorite characters.

Even though you’re continuing the story with Emma: Further Tales, when you look back at Emma as a whole, what are your impressions? If you could go back and create it again, would you do anything differently?

I never would have thought so many people would read and enjoy my work. It’s not perfect, but I think it turned out much better than I imagined.

If I were to create Emma again, I might change the phrasing of a few lines and amend some things here and there, but I would probably keep it faithful to the original version. I put all my energy into creating Emma in a limited amount of time every month. Sometimes I had to push myself even after I was completely exhausted. It might not be perfect, but I believe I made all the right choices. Six years of my life were dedicated to Emma and I have no regrets.

How do you hope audiences are affected by Emma? What do you hope audiences are taking away from the story?

When I first started reading manga it was a revelation. I thought, “Manga is fun! I didn’t know manga could express something like this!” It would make me happy if the reader thought the same when they read my manga. It would make me really happy if the reader thought, “Maids are wonderful! The Victorian Era is fascinating!”

It would be great if Emma made people interested in other manga and motivated them to draw their own. If more people drew manga, I’m sure there would be a lot more interesting manga out there. I’d like to read many more interesting manga. Personally, I’d like to read a manga based on a maid during the Victorian Era.

Do you have a message for the English-speaking fans who are about to experience the Emma anime and manga for the first time?

I hope you enjoy Emma. It would make me happy if you enjoyed both the manga and anime.

A very special thanks to dedicated fan “Lego” (Brandon) for his assistance with the questions for this interview!

Kaoru Mori Bio

Born September 18, 1978, Ms. Mori harbors a true love for all things British. Her first commercial work, Emma, which follows the life of an English maid, launched her into the spotlight in 2001 when it was first serialized in Comic Beam. Emma quickly gained a loyal following, and ran for ten volumes. In 2005, the series won the Excellence Prize in the Manga Division of the 9th annual Japan Media Arts Festival. That same year, Emma was adapted into an anime by Studio Pierrot, and Ms. Mori collaborated with Riko Murakami to create the Emma Victorian Guides. One of Ms. Mori’s most recent works is Shirley, a spin-off story set in the Emma world.

Emma: A Victorian Romance © Kaoru Mori • ENTERBRAIN, INC./Emma Production Committee.